detention:

I FOLLOW BACK 1OO%

detention:

I FOLLOW BACK 1OO%

(Source: buddhabrot, via feellng)


Photos of famous landmarks while they were still under construction.

(Source: yourackdisciprine, via my-armor-is-made-of-steel)

likeafieldmouse:

Sharon Johnstone - Macro (2012)

(via likeaphysicist)

sallykwitt:

After The Rain – Tara Woodruff http://bit.ly/199JXTY

sallykwitt:

After The Rain – Tara Woodruff http://bit.ly/199JXTY

So the universe is not quite as you thought it was.
You’d better rearrange your beliefs, then. Because you certainly can’t rearrange the universe.

Isaac Asimov (via we-are-star-stuff)

That’s the thing about the universe, it’s never the way we think it is, and when we get to know it, we realize ten more things we didn’t know.

(via jtotheizzoe)

(Source: goodreads.com, via subatomiconsciousness)

mucholderthen:

Star sizes by *MartinSilvertant

This is a design to showcase the biggest star (VY Canis Majoris) and compare it with increasingly smaller but also increasingly familiar bodies.
The color given to each body is its average color, and in case of the stars reflects how hot it is. Stars that emit blue or even ultraviolet light are the hottest, while stars that emit red light are significantly cooler.
Below each name of the star you will find how many solar radii big they are (1 solar radius is the size of the Sun). In case of the planets, it shows how many Earth radii each body is.
VY Canis Majoris is 1,800 to 2,100 solar radii big, which means that 5,832,000,000 to 9,621,000,000 Suns will fit into VY Canis Majoris.
Our sun is the only star close enough to make proper photographs of, so all other photos were unusable in this presentation. Artists’ impressions aren’t always equally accurate. For example, the Sun looks red in all photo’s, yet it’s classified as a yellow dwarf, and it emits yellow to greenish light.
That’s why I chose to make an abstract representation of each body, because in this presentation only size and color matters; not what the body actually looks like. Browse the web if you want to find out what they look like.

mucholderthen:

Star sizes
by *MartinSilvertant

This is a design to showcase the biggest star (VY Canis Majoris) and compare it with increasingly smaller but also increasingly familiar bodies.

The color given to each body is its average color, and in case of the stars reflects how hot it is. Stars that emit blue or even ultraviolet light are the hottest, while stars that emit red light are significantly cooler.

Below each name of the star you will find how many solar radii big they are (1 solar radius is the size of the Sun). In case of the planets, it shows how many Earth radii each body is.

VY Canis Majoris is 1,800 to 2,100 solar radii big, which means that 5,832,000,000 to 9,621,000,000 Suns will fit into VY Canis Majoris.

Our sun is the only star close enough to make proper photographs of, so all other photos were unusable in this presentation. Artists’ impressions aren’t always equally accurate. For example, the Sun looks red in all photo’s, yet it’s classified as a yellow dwarf, and it emits yellow to greenish light.

That’s why I chose to make an abstract representation of each body, because in this presentation only size and color matters; not what the body actually looks like. Browse the web if you want to find out what they look like.

(via likeaphysicist)

staceythinx:

A big dose of awe brought to you by photographer Goff Kitsawad 

It will happen.
One of
these days.
Sweet!